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Monthly Archives: January 2013

Found this at Emfilus‘ twitter:

Den här bilden skulle kunna vara kursmaterial i vilken genusfokuserad utbildning som helst.

This sort of unconscious expression is how we can see how unequal people still are. 
These three people are all sports journalists, probably all equally qualified, yet the woman is pushed into taking very little space compared to the two men with their wide, spread legs and powerful postures. She’s not as important as them.

 

I wasn’t sure if I should post this with names or without. It regards a Swedish blogger whom I absolutely can’t stand, and think is offensive, rude and… sick, actually, and I don’t really want to generate traffic to her blog. On the other hand, I do want to write this, and writing it without names seems cowardly.

So:

There is a Swedish blogger/PR-person called Katrin Zytomierska who’s famous for being provocative. She regularly makes fairly outrageous statements about everything from au-pairs to cleaners to childrearing, but she’s made it her mission in life to hate on fat people.

As in writing a lot about how fat people personally disgust her. How she’d never hire a fat person. How it’s a scandal for a gym chain ad to feature a woman who’s not super skinny. She’s a big fan of the LCHF diet, and has written several books on the subject.

Now, I’m not generally against people writing cookbooks or lifestyle books or things like that. What I do take offense at is when someone writes an entire book dedicated to fat-shaming and basically pointing out that the only reason to eat LCHF or exercise or generally live is to become skinny.

I swear, this woman needs therapy for her eating disorder.

Katrin Zytomierska recently acquired a disciple. A fat woman joined her diet-program and blogs about her weight-loss, and Katrin Zytomierska also uses this as a promotional tool for the diet-program. I can say nothing about this woman or her motivations,  but when she posts this on her blog, I can’t think of any of them as healthy influences:

20130110-100652.jpg

It freaks me out.

[For those of you who speak Swedish, this is a link to Katrin Zytomierska’s old blog, where the quote from the title comes from. I don’t recommend it unless you have a drink or two first. I won’t link to the blog I got the picture from, as I considering it triggering for a lot of people. Live with it. ]

I had a talk with my friend Sara today, a fellow student at SSE, and we talked a bit about being teenagers.

I’m sure all of you remember it. And i’m sure most of you aren’t eager to repeat the experience.

I don’t remember life as being terribly hard when I was 12-18, but I know there were so many things that upset me, so many hours spent discussing trivial things that don’t matter know. Even when I was slightly older and living in the US, almost all of our time was spent with drama. Who’s friends with who, I’ve got a crush on him, he doesn’t like me…

And I can objectively say, my life is much harder today. I work much more, I have so much more complicated things to think about… My future, my family, my friends… And yet, life is so much easier now, at 23 than it was at 17.

Things like going on holiday somewhere new was daunting at 17. At 23, I’m nervous but I know I can handle pretty much anything that may happen. I’m so much better equipped to handle whatever life throws at me.

No matter that SSE is so much harder than high school, that it matters much more and that it’s so intense compared to everything else. I can handle it all in a different way. Even though an outsider would say there’s so much more against me today, it doesn’t feel that way.

I guess that’sn why they tell you life gets better when you grow up. And why I, no matter how much “easier” being 17 was, never want to have to do it again.

More Steubenville and more rape culture.

This is an especially great video from a man about what we as a society need to teach young men.Because blame should always be placed where it belongs, with the rapist, not the victim. But we can’t act like all rapists are gun-wielding mad men who assault women in parks, because almost none of them are. But boys and men today aren’t taught that it’s unacceptable to touch, have sex with or shout at someone just because you feel like it. They’re taught it’s ok and what they should be doing to be “manly”.  And however hard it is for me to admit this, we cannot teach young men that they’re entitled to women’s bodies and then start yelling loudly when they act on that, because they simply didn’t know better. We need to act much, much earlier than that by teaching everyone, boys and girls, about their right to their own bodies, and the fact that you never, ever have a right to someone else’s body, unless they consent.

This is why sex ed is so important, y’all.

Now go watch the video:

Technically, I’m writing an essay that’s due tonight, which is the exact reason why I’m blogging so much today.

I just wanted to share this “lovely” example of sexism for kids. This is a dance costume, obviously aimed at younger kids. Cute, a pair of overalls and a striped sweater in different colors, very suitable for a mixed group of kids.

Except the makers obviously saw the need to make two versions of the costume, one for girls and one for boys. The boys has trouser legs to below his knees, a real shirt while the girls have very short trouser legs and some sort of leotard with attachable sweater arms (I don’t even know what to call them…)

If ANYONE can tell me a single reason why there should be a boy and a girl version of this costume, a real reason, I’m listening.

(…I would also like to point out the heavy makeup and sexualized poses…)